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Glenwood Springs Immigration Law Blog

What to expect when adjusting your immigration status

Dealing with immigration issues can be a very scary and difficult process. It is something that people normally do with help from an experienced attorney. Even changing your immigration status from temporary to permanent can be very hard for many people. The forms are often confusing and unclear about the information that the immigration office requires you to provide. Fortunately, an immigration lawyer in the Glenwood Springs area can help get you through the process to adjust your residency status.

Your immigration lawyer will be able to walk you through the steps and ensure you submit all the correct documents. If you are going to start the "adjustment of status" process, read further for information on what you can expect.

Have you answered these immigration frequently asked questions?

Are you interested in immigrating to the United States? Are you hoping to help a family member make their way to the country in a legal manner?

If you answered yes to either question, it's important to understand the many immigration laws that could impact your situation.

Things to know about Green Cards

No matter why you want to live in the United States of America, you will have to go through different processes to be legally recognized as a permanent resident. Fortunately for immigrants, there are many different ways to become a legal and permanent resident, but for many people the best option is to get a Green Card.

What is a Green Card?

A Green Card is a permit that shows that the person who has it is legally allowed to live and work in the United States. Once a person has a Green Card, they are considered a permanent resident of America and they can live and work in the U.S. indefinitely.

Do non-citizens and immigrants have constitutional rights in America?

No matter how you feel about the current political climate, it is hard to deny that things are changing quickly. Since the most recent presidential election, new laws and orders have been made and the way existing laws and orders are enforced have changed. It looks like change is not going to stop any time soon, but there are some things that will probably stay the same: Constitutional rights.

It is in times like these that it is most important for people, citizens and non-citizens alike, to know their rights. Even many U.S. citizens are not fully aware of their rights as Americans and learning more about them can be difficult, but when it comes to American law, everyone has basic rights.

DACA could protect you from deportation

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) protects you from being deported if you meet the requirements. If you were brought to the U.S. when you were younger, you may be eligible for DACA. DACA does not grant you citizenship, but there may be ways to get a green card after you have been granted deferred action, depending on your situation.

Will a relative suffer if you are deported?

Hundreds of thousands of people live in fear of deportation in Colorado. Immigrants living illegally in the U.S. worry because deportation not only uproots your life but can hurt family members. It is possible to fight against deportation by showing that your family will greatly suffer if you were forced to leave the country.

If family members will experience extreme hardship then you could avoid deportation

According to a new policy established this year, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) can give immigrants who are illegally living in the U.S. for over a year an extreme hardship waiver based on undue hardship for family members. While losing your job, uprooting and separating your family are considered typical effects of deportation, an extreme hardship must go beyond these issues. Extreme hardship can affect your parents, siblings, and extended family members for many reasons.

Family-based green cards

Reuniting with families is a top priority for legal U.S. citizens. When families are in another country and not a citizen, this can be difficult. Immigration laws and guidelines can be confusing and hard to process sometimes. A family-based green card is a great option to consider if you want bring your family into the U.S. legally.

Legal Immigration for citizens' families

Family-based green cards are a way for legal immigrants to bring their families into the United States to become legal citizens. When you want to bring family members into the U.S. legally, they must be immediate relatives. This includes:

ATTENTION DREAMERS!!!!

It is recommended that you apply five months before your current work authorization expires.

We have special discounted prices for DREAMer renewals, so call us today!

(970) 989-9906

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Glenwood Springs, CO 81601

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